Hippophae rhamnoides

                 
                 
Common Name Sea Buckthorn, Seaberry
Family Elaeagnaceae
Synonyms  
Known Hazards Some reports suggest that the fruit is poisonous[13, 100], whilst it may be very acid it is most definitely not poisonous[65]. Avoid during pregnancy.
Habitats Usually found near the coast, often forming thickets on fixed dunes and sea cliffs[9, 17, 244].
Range Europe, including Britain, from Norway south and east to Spain and Asia to Japan and the Himalayas.
Edibility Rating  
Medicinal Rating  
Care
Fully Hardy Well drained soil Moist Soil Wet Soil Full sun

Summary       
Bloom Color: Yellow. Main Bloom Time: Early spring, Late spring, Mid spring. Also known as: Ananas de Sibérie, Argasse, Argousier, Argousier Faux-Nerprun, Bourdaine Marine, Buckthorn, Chharma, Dhar-Bu, Épine Luisante, Épine Marrante, Espino Armarillo, Espino Falso, Faux Nerprun, Finbar, Grisset, Meerdorn, Oblepikha, Olivier de Sibérie, Purging Thorn, Rokitnik, Sallow Thorn, Sanddorn, Saule Épineux, Sceitbezien, Sea-Buckthorn, Seedorn, Star-Bu, Tindved. Form: Rounded, Spreading or horizontal.

Physical Characteristics       
 icon of manicon of shrub
Hippophae rhamnoides is a deciduous Shrub growing to 6 m (19ft) by 2.5 m (8ft) at a medium rate.
It is hardy to zone (UK) 3 and is not frost tender. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required) and are pollinated by Wind.The plant is not self-fertile.
It can fix Nitrogen.


USDA hardiness zone : 3-7


Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry moist or wet soil and can tolerate drought. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Hippophae rhamnoides Sea Buckthorn, Seaberry


(c) 2010 Ken Fern & Plants For A Future
Hippophae rhamnoides Sea Buckthorn, Seaberry
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Lycaon
   
Habitats       
Woodland Garden Sunny Edge; Bog Garden;
Edible Uses                                         
Edible Parts: Fruit;  Oil.
Edible Uses: Oil.

Fruit - raw or cooked. Very rich in vitamin C (120mg per 100g)[74] and vitamin A[183], they are too acid when raw for most peoples tastes[11, 158], though most children seem to relish them[K]. Used for making fruit juice, it is high in vitamins and has an attractive aroma[141]. It is being increasingly used in making fruit juices, especially when mixed with other fruits, because of its reputed health benefits[214]. The fruits of some species and cultivars (not specified) contain up to 9.2% oil[214]. The fruit is very freely borne along the stems[K] and is about 6 - 8mm in diameter[200]. The fruit becomes less acid after a frost or if cooked[74]. The fruit is ripe from late September and usually hangs on the plants all winter if not eaten by the birds. It is best used before any frosts since the taste and quality of frosted berries quickly deteriorates[214].
 
Medicinal Uses


Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Astringent;  Cancer;  Cardiac;  Poultice;  Tonic;  Vermifuge.

The twigs and leaves contain 4 - 5% tannin[240]. They are astringent and vermifuge[7, 100]. The tender branches and leaves contain bio-active substances which are used to produce an oil that is quite distinct from the oil produced from the fruit. Yields of around 3% of oil are obtained[240]. This oil is used as an ointment for treating burns[214]. A high-quality medicinal oil is made from the fruit and used in the treatment of cardiac disorders, it is also said to be particularly effective when applied to the skin to heal burns, eczema and radiation injury, and is taken internally in the treatment of stomach and intestinal diseases[214]. The fruit is astringent and used as a tonic[9, 254]. The freshly-pressed juice is used in the treatment of colds, febrile conditions, exhaustion etc[9]. The fruit is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers[214]. The juice is also a component of many vitamin-rich medicaments and cosmetic preparations such as face-creams and toothpastes[9]. A decoction of the fruit has been used as a wash to treat skin irritation and eruptions[254].
Other Uses
Charcoal;  Cosmetic;  Dye;  Fuel;  Oil;  Pioneer;  Soil stabilization;  Wood.

Very tolerant of maritime exposure[29, 49, 75, 182], it can be used as a shelter hedge. It dislikes much trimming[75]. A very thorny plant, it quickly makes an impenetrable barrier. Sea buckthorn has an extensive root system and suckers vigorously and so has been used in soil conservation schemes, especially on sandy soils. The fibrous and suckering root system acts to bind the sand[186, 244]. Because the plant grows quickly, even in very exposed conditions, and also adds nitrogen to the soil, it can be used as a pioneer species to help the re-establishment of woodland in difficult areas. Because the plant is very light-demanding it will eventually be out-competed by the woodland trees and so will not out-stay its welcome[K]. The seeds contain 12 - 13% of a slow-drying oil[240]. The vitamin-rich fruit juice is used cosmetically in face-masks etc[9]. A yellow dye is obtained from the fruit[74]. A yellow dye is obtained from the stems, root and foliage[4]. A blackish-brown dye is obtained from the young leaves and shoots[74]. Wood - tough, hard, very durable, fine-grained. Used for fine carpentry, turning etc[46, 61, 74]. The wood is also used for fuel and charcoal[146].
Cultivation details                                         
Landscape Uses:Border, Seashore, Specimen. Succeeds in most soils[200], including poor ones[186], so long as they are not too dry[182, 200]. Grows well by water and in fairly wet soils[182]. Established plants are very drought resistant[186]. Requires a sunny position[3], seedlings failing to grow in a shady position and mature shrubs quickly dying if overshadowed by taller plants[186]. Does well in very sandy soils[1, 186]. Very tolerant of maritime exposure[75]. Plants are fairly slow growing[75]. Although usually found near the coast in the wild, they thrive when grown inland[11] and are hardy to about -25°c[184]. A very ornamental plant[1, 11], it is occasionally cultivated, especially in N. Europe, for its edible fruit, there are some named varieties[183]. 'Leikora' is a free-fruiting form, developed for its ornamental value. Members of this genus are attracting considerable interest from breeding institutes for their nutrient-rich fruits that can promote the general health of the body (see edible and medicinal uses below)[214]. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[113, 186, 200]. Plants produce abundant suckers, especially when grown on sandy soils[186]. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. The sexes of plants cannot be distinguished before flowering, but on flowering plants the buds of male plants in winter are conical and conspicuous whilst female buds are smaller and rounded[11]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200].Special Features:Not North American native, Naturalizing, Inconspicuous flowers or blooms.
                                                                                 
Propagation                                         
Seed - sow spring in a sunny position in a cold frame[78]. Germination is usually quick and good although 3 months cold stratification may improve the germination rate. Alternatively the seed can be sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring into their permanent positions. Male seedlings, in spring, have very prominent axillary buds whilst females are clear and smooth at this time[78]. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, June/July in a frame[200]. Difficult[113]. This is the easiest method of vegetative propagation[214]. Cuttings of mature wood in autumn[200]. Difficult[113]. The cuttings should be taken at the end of autumn or very early in the spring before the buds burst. Store them in sand and peat until April, cut into 7 - 9cm lengths and plant them in a plastic tent with bottom heat[214]. Rooting should take place within 2 months and they can be put in their permanent positions in the autumn[214]. Division of suckers in the winter. They can be planted out direct into their permanent positions and usually establish well and quickly[K]. Layering in autumn[200].

3 pictures

Related

Sea Buckthorn / Sea Berry seeds

Sea Buckthorn / Sea Berry seeds

Botanical name  Hippophae rhamnoides
Drought tolerance  
Edible  
Evergreen  
Fruit / berries  
Nitrogen fixer  
Perennial  
Tags    perennial  tree  berry  health 
Price  $4.9030 seeds
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Belongs to the following Article

Nitrogen fixing plant species suited to temperate climate such as North Canterbury New Zealand

Nitrogen fixing plant species suited to temperate climate such as North Canterbury New Zealand

Nitrogen is an essential element for plant growth. Certain plants have a useful ability to capture nitrogen from the atmosphere. This is often achieved through symbiotic relationship with fungi in the root zone. Being able access unlimited nitrogen allows these plants to grow quickly while also making some available to surrounding plants. The practical reality is that including nitrogen fixing plants of various shapes and sizes amongst other productive plantings improves overall health, vigour and fertility,